Learning what eating is all about

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Highlights
  • Certain motor skills are important for helping your baby advance to solid foods.
  • All babies develop at their own pace — always follow his cues.

When it comes to starting solid foods, how much your Supported Sitter has developed is very important. Around 4 to 6 months your baby will begin to develop certain motor skills that you may not even notice. 

Your baby’s progress to solid foods and new textures depends on his stage of development. Is he adventurous or cautious? Remember, each baby develops at his own pace, so follow his unique cues.

He’s becoming accomplished at certain motor skills such as:

  • Intentionally moving his tongue when he feels food on it versus moving it forward and spitting the food out as a reaction.
  • Moving food in his mouth with an up-and-down motion of his jaw.
  • Anticipating the spoon with an open mouth rather than relying on the touch of the spoon to his mouth as a cue to open up.
  • Moving his tongue from the front to the back of the mouth for swallowing.
  • Leaning toward you and opening his mouth to signal he wants a bite.
  • Turning away from you and leaning back when he is finished.


Once you and your baby’s doctor decide your baby is ready, you can choose developmentally appropriate foods to feed, like Iron-rich, single grain infant cereal and single-fruit and vegetable baby food. Remember, your baby will decide how much to eat. Allowing your baby to decide how much he eats helps encourage self-regulation and promotes healthy eating habits.

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